Brain Injury, low carb, MS and Ketogenic Diet, My Story, myelin, sugar is dangerous, Uncategorized

6. High Fat, Low Carb (HFLC)

High Fat, Low Carb (HFLC)

High fat

With Multiple Sclerosis (MS), holes appear in the myelin (fatty insulation covering the brain’s “wires”). These holes distort or prevent signals getting from the brain through to, for example, a finger. A high fat intake helps myelin  by giving it the nutrients that it needs.

I am not saying to eat the so-called “bad” fats like fish & chips or processed foods because they don’t give our body nutrition. However, “good” fats come from foods such as, for example, salmon, avocadoes, coconut oil and cream. Since our body doesn’t manufacture these nutrients, it is vital that we get them from another source, i.e., food.

avocado.jpeg

 

Also, because fat is filling, it means that I feel full and satisfied after eating and am never hungry. The problem when sugar is consumed is that you feel hungry because the sugar has not replenished your cells or given them any nourishment so the body still feels hungry for nourishment. To make matters worse, the body also craves more sugar to make up for the lowered sugar level (see blog 5).

Low carb/ no sugar

Initially, this was the difficult part! Low carb means low carbohydrates which are all the foods I used to eat! This includes breads, crackers, pasta, potatoes, rice, and of course cakes, biscuits etc. The desire for bread and pasta left me after some time. I also found it difficult to find something to eat at lunchtime, for example, in the canteen, which doesn’t contain bread, pasta, or chips (fries)! The trick is to always take my own prepared lunch which doesn’t contain carbs AND saves me money too!

I found it difficult to stop sugar (because I was addicted to the stuff!) but after a short while, the craving for something sweet left me. This was indeed a liberating moment, to be completely free of sugar cravings.  It had ruled my life for 20 years! However, once I got the initial few days over with, the cravings left and didn’t really come back. I rarely crave something sweet.

I have had much help from “The Wahl’s Protocol” book (see blog 4 for link to this book) which explains the science behind the influence of good nutrition on the cells in more detail. I have also had tremendous help with what to eat from Libbyditchthecarbs who has a website, Facebook page, and published books with her low carb recipes including low carb meals, deserts, snacks, family meals, lunches, and party foods. You name it, Libbyditchthecarbs  has a recipe for it! From time to time, if I do fancy something sweet, I can still have something sweet and low carb! Through Libbyditchthecarbs, I found quick, easy and delicious recipes for sweet treats, deserts, and amazingly good “fat bombs” which satisfy any cravings for something sweet. Link to ditchthecarbs:  https://www.ditchthecarbs.com

I have been high fat, low carb for a couple of years now and my improvements so far include:

  • being able to think straight (no brain fog)
  • better leg “connection” (quicker reaction time and more controlled movements)
  • mobility; more natural, balanced walking
  • better balance
  • less dizziness when moving head or turning round
  • the feeling/ sensation on the left side of my face has returned
  • the feeling/ sensation in my fingertips has returned
  • finger “connection” (quicker reaction time and improved fine motor skills)
  • clearer skin/ better complexion
  • whiter eyes
  • and a more stable state of mind, no more cravings for chocolate!!

I also think that my eyesight and “face blindness” have improved slightly but I will talk about this in more detail in my next blog. If you liked this, be sure to subscribe. It’s free and you will have access to my weekly blogs. If there are specific areas of interest that you would like me to write about, please comment or write a question and I’ll do my very best to answer. I would love to hear from you!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12 thoughts on “6. High Fat, Low Carb (HFLC)”

  1. I cut out sugar, gluten, dairy, legumes and as much processed food as I could at the end of 2015. After 15 years of 3-4 annual relapses requiring cortisone, I have not had one since! I had scoffed at the power of diet to affect my MS – so the egg is dripping off my face!! 🙂
    I always say we are all different and what works for one may not work for another….but, this has worked for me – my son even said he can have a decent conversation with me again! Wow!
    Great post!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Wow, it’s so good to hear that this has worked for you and your MS too! I agree that it is not for everyone but I’m so glad that it has had such a dramatic affect on my symptoms. Thanks so much for your words of encouragement. You’re an inspiration! 😉

      Liked by 1 person

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